Monthly Archives: July 2007

Whirlpool-Maytag-Kenmore Cabrio, Bravos, Oasis Washers: Control Board Displays F51 Code

Working on one o’ them fancy new Bravos, Cabrios, or Oasis (Oasises? Oasisi?) and you’re getting the confounding F51 error code? The reason could well be due to an intermittent connection at the Rotor Position Sensor, (RPS).

To correct this, remove and reinstall the connector at the RPS at least three times to clean off any corrosion built up on the connector and RPS due to the intermittent connection. Confirm that the connector is fully seated onto the RPS control upon final connection and verify there are no damaged wires. Replace the electronic control. The upgraded control is less sensitive to intermittent RPS connections.

To learn more about your washing machine, or to order parts, click here.

How Does the Gas Valve work in a Gas Oven?

If you’re working on a gas oven that won’t fire up, first come grok this appliance repair revelation that explains how the gas system works in a gas oven. Sublime Masters Pegi and Trying To Help explain how to apply this knowledge in repairing a gas oven that won’t fire up. Although the discussion is for a Magic Chef range, the same principles apply to all brands using hot surface ignition.

What’s a “Grounded Heating Element” in a Dryer?

If your dryer stays warm (or hot) when the timer is turned to anywhere other than “off,” you may have what we professional appliantologists call a “grounded heating element.” Sublime Master Pegi explains in this topic at the repair forum.

To learn more about your dryer, or to order parts, click here.

Appliantology Newsletter, Summer 2007

Konnichiwa, my friends. It’s been a long, cold winter and now half the summer is gone but, at long last, the wait is over: the Summer 2007 issue of our award-winning newsletter, Appliantology, is out. Lots of good appliance tips in this issue so hurry and download it today before it gets all used up!

How to Replace the Evaporator Fan in a Maytag Refrigerator

If you have a recent model Maytag refrigerator (such as model number MFD2561), then Sublime Master Trying To Help has posted a DIY help doc at the repair forum to help you replace the evaporator fan motor. Check it out, yo!

So, right about now you’re axin’ yerself, “But, wise and fermented Samurai, what is an ‘evaporator fan motor’ and how would I even suspect that I may need to replace it? And, oh, by the way, just what in the hell is an evaporator, anyway?” Aye, it warms me cockles to see you jigglin’ that grey jelly ‘twixt your ears like so much belly blubber.

The part of your refrigerator that makes all the cold air is called the evaporator. It’s an aluminum coil that gets really cold (about -20 to -15F in a properly functioning refrigerator). The evaporator fan is mounted just above the evaporator coil and pulls air across the coil, chilling it, and circulates it around the freezer to keep it at around 0F. A portion of this air is diverted into the beer compartment to keep it between 34 and 38F. For more goodies about your refrigerator’s anatomy, see these excellent interactive diagrams of refrigerator guts; they show the three conventional styles: freezer on top, freezer on bottom, and side-by-side.

A sure sign that the evaporator fan has shat the bed is if you don’t hear it running when the compressor is running. After you confirm that the fan is getting the proper supply voltage, then you have proven that the fan is bad– come git you one!