Monthly Archives: December 2010

Blessed Nativity and God be with us all in 2011! – The Samurai School of Appliantology

A joyous Nativity Feast of Our Lord from the Samurai clan to you!

Resized to 76% (was 663 x 1023) – Click image to enlarge

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A Christmas haiku for you!

Economy: bad.
Drown ye not in worldly cares,
for God is with us!

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The original Christmas tree:

Resized to 66% (was 762 x 1023) – Click image to enlarge

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(original icon from Fr. Andrew Tregubov, www.tregubovstudios.com)

My two Samurai spudlets and I are taking off December 29 on a spiritual pilgrimage to the Holy Mountain, Mt. Athos, in Greece. We’ll celebrate Old Calendar (Julian) Nativity and New Year’s with the brothers at Vatopedi Monastery where we’ll be staying for nine days. If you’re curious, you can read more about Mt. Athos and Vatopedi monastery where we’ll be staying.

My hope and plan is to do frequent updates about the trip at a Posterous site I set up just for this pilgrimage: mountathos.posterous.com. There’s nothing posted there yet but soon will be once the journey gets underway. Bookmark it and check in with it if you wanna keep up with what’s happening. You can also subscribe to it so that new posts get emailed to you.

Hopefully, I’ll be able to check in periodically while on pilgrimage. In any event, you’ll be in good hands with RegUS_PatOff, the Samurai School of Appliantology Super Moderator and Grand Master Funk.

Are you a Master Appliantologist? A special offer for Brethren in The Craft

Do you repair appliances for a living? If so, you could get a complimentary upgrade to Master Appliantologist at the world-famous Samurai School of Appliantology! Just drop me an email (samurai _AT_ appliantology.org) and let me know something about your background in The Craft: years of experience, companies worked for, brands trained on– don’t go crazy, just give me enough info so it’s obvious that you’re a professional appliance repair tech. I’ll give you a complimentary upgrade to Master Appliantologist which gives you all the perks of being an Apprentice Appliantologist plus access to tech-only forums.

Kanpai!

Samurai Appliance Repair Man
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The Samurai School of Appliantology, www.appliantology.org

Konnichiwa!

Hope you had a nice Thanksgiving holiday with friends and family. In between mouthfuls of turkey and beer, I was busy morphing the Samurai Appliance Repair Forums into our shiny new Samurai School of Appliantology at http://appliantology.org — add this to your bookmarks and all those other presents under your Christmas tree.

The new School has been running for about three weeks now. The Great Forum Migration (GFM) consisted of taking the old forum’s humongous database and converting it to run under the new forum software. Almost all the old topics and accounts crossed the Red Sea unscathed and made it to the Promised Land.

As with any big migration and conversion, I knew there’d be plenty of bugzillas scurrying about so I wanted to debug and delouse as much as possible before sending out this announcement.

A known problem is that about 30 Chief Apprentice Appliantologists got water logged and transferred over as Grasshoppers. If you’re one of these soggy Chiefs, please let me know and I’ll fix it mo’scratchie. Other than that, the only bugs you’ll see in the Samurai School are Grasshoppahs. :)

Looking for a unique gift for that special-ed someone? Give the gift of appliance enlightenment and buy them an apprenticeship at the Samurai School of Appliantology. Makes a great inbox stuffer, too! http://appliantology.org

You’re probably familiar with our old repair forums at http://applianceguru.com. They ran on an outdated forum software package that had limited capabilities compared to the spiffy stuff that’s out there today. The old forums are still open but for archival, read-only use– no new topics or registrations.

You should be able to log in to the the new Samurai School at http://appliantology.org with your old login credentials. You can also log in using Facebook or Twitter. If you have an existing account at the old forums, you’ll have the option of connecting your FB/Twitter login to your new account at the Samurai School; if you are creating a new account at the School, you can log in with FB/Twitter and bypass the verification.

On behalf of all the faculty and staff at the Samurai School of Appliantology, we wish you a Merry Christmas, Happy Hanukkah, Kwazy Kwanza, Freaky Festivus or whatever other kind of holiday you celebrate this season.

Samurai Appliance Repair Man
Fermented Grand Master
The Samurai School of Appliantology
http://appliantology.org

GE electronic ice maker freezing up around the paddle area

Leaking GE Icemaker

Leaking GE Icemaker - Closeup of Leak from Module Head

This ice maker has developed a leak between the control head and the mold, not uncommon in these cheesy GE icemakers.

The Fix: Replace the icemaker==> http://www.repairclinic.com/PartDetail/Ice-Maker-Assembly/1399596

To learn more about your ice maker, or to order parts, click here.

Troubleshooting a Whirlpool DSI gas range: no bake, no broil, no spark; replaced DSI board, no change

I’ve posted several troubleshooting tips in the past on Whirlpool’s finicky and temperamental Direct Spark Ignition (DSI) gas range (see this page). This one is a special case no-ignition case where you’ve ruled out the other possible causes that I’ve posted about previously and even replaced the DSI spark board in a desperate but blind attempt to solve the problem. Wellll, you just grab o’ them squishy lumps below your spine and come romp with with the Samurai on another DSI range repair adventure!

First thing, check for 120vac coming out of the ERC (the electronic range control, aka “clock,” also called an oven control board) and into the new DSI board at the Bake J1-6 or Broil J1-7 harness connectors.

If you don’t have this voltage, then you need a new oven ERC (oven control board) ==> http://www.repairclinic.com/Model-SF378LEPS1-ID-655278-Circuit-Board-Or-Timer-Parts

If you have 120vac present, then you know the ERC is calling for heat properly. On to the gas valve…

Whirlpool DSI Gas Range GS563LXS - Bake and Broil Solenoid Activated Ports
(click to enlarge)

Both coils on the gas valve have to have continuity or it will not work. The DSI control checks this before it does a function. Also note that these coils are LOW VOLTAGE DC 8 to 18 VDC.

To test, remove the wires at the gas valve and ohm from the center terminal (Common) to the upper one (Broil); then from the center terminal (Common) to the lower one (Bake). If either one is open then you need a gas valve, get it here==> http://www.repairclinic.com/PartDetail/Gas-Valve-Assembly/1159151?modelNumber=GS563LXSQ0

Samurai Appliance Repair Man
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Introduction to Microwave Oven Repair

Someone posted this nifty Youtube video from Dave’s Farm in the Samurai School of Appliantology. It’s a well-made and easy-to-understand introduction to microwave ovens for do-it-yourselfers. Gives just the info you need, without using any jargon, to understand basic operation and do common repairs.

Samurai Appliance Repair Man
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Replacing the thermal limiter in an LG Tromm electric dryer

If your LG dryer (example model number DLE7177WM) won’t start, one possibility is that the thermal limiter is burned out. This usually happens in situations where the dryer was taking too long to dry laundry the last several loads. If this was the case, the THERMAL LIMITER on the heater housing may have shut-down the dryer. When this occurs, the dryer cannot be made to start again until the THERMAL LIMITER has been replaced and the actual cause of the overheating is found and corrected. Usually, this is a poorly designed or installed vent.

To facilitate your appliance repair adventure, Sublime Master john63 in the Samurai School of Appliantology has prepared this step-by-step instruction for replacing the thermal limiter. BTW, here’s the part link to your replacement thermal limiter==> http://www.repairclinic.com/PartDetail/High-Limit-Thermostat/1268366?modelNumber=DLE7177WM

1) Unplug the dryer.

2) Remove 3 “phillips” screws from the TOP COVER of the dryer. These screws are at the rear of the top cover.

3) Slide the top cover rearward about an inch & lift-off.

4) Open the DOOR of the dryer & remove 2 screws under the *opening*. Roughly located at the 5 and 7 O’clock locations.

5) Standing in front of the dryer & looking behind the control panel—unplug all wire connections to the MAIN BOARD.

6) Now remove the screws from the *corners* of the CONTROL PANEL (Note: Some dryers only have one screw on the right side

7) Grasp the top of the CONTROL PANEL & forcefully “peel” the panel off (This plastic is tough).

8) With the CONTROL PANEL removed—you’ll notice 4 screws that secure the FRONT COVER. Remove those & slowly tilt the FRONT COVER towards you—disconnect the DOOR SWITCH PLUG. Set aside the front cover. Step back & look at the front of the dryer. On the lower right side is a *white* plug. Squeeze the tab on this plug & pull apart to disconnect. This is the plug for the MOISTURE SENSOR. (During re-assembly—don’t forget this little guy).

9) Grab a FELT-TIP MARKER & place a *dot* next to the 2 screws on the front of the *silver* bracket that the CONTROL PANEL *snaps* onto. Then remove the 2 screws. Remove the other 2 screws at the top of the *silver* bracket and remove the silver bracket by pulling upward.

10) Remove 4 screws at each corner (or ear) of the FRONT DRUM SUPPORT ASSY.

11) Pull the SUPPORT ASSY upward & towards you–set aside.

12) Grab the DRUM & rotate counterclockwise while pulling towards you. The belt will slip off. Remove the DRUM.

13) You’ll see a silver/square box on the right-hand side. Pull off the wires to the THERMAL LIMITER & test it for *continuity* with the test meter. If “open”—replace the THERMAL LIMITER and the other THERMOSTAT next to it.

14) If the THERMAL LIMITER has failed—the home exhaust vent *must* be cleaned. 100%.

15) Use a shop vac to clean everything up.

Re-assemble in reverse order.

Samurai Appliance Repair Man
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Hall Effect sensors in LG washing machines

The LG front loading washers don’t use your typical belt and motor drive arrangement to move the wash basket. Instead, they use an ingenious, magnetic drive system consisting of an stator and a rotor; more about these in this post.

A Hall Effect sensor is used to let the control board know the position and speed of the drum rotor in these washer. in earlier versions, Hall Effect sensors were a common-fail item because, despite shelling out over a $1,000 for a top-notch washing machine, people would try to save a few pennies by not using HE detergent despite the manufacturers clear instructions to do so. Can you say, “penny wise, dollar dumb?” More about using non-HE detergents in this post. BTW, using non-HE detergents in your high-efficiency front loading washer is also a great way to help bring on early drum bearing failure.

Anyway, Sublime Master john63 in the Samurai School of Appliantology enlightens us with some background info on the Hall Effect sensors in LG washers and their design changes in response to boneheads who refuse to use HE detergent:

Older LG washers had a weaker version of the sensor.

Newer (late ’07/early ’08) LG washers have a HALL EFFECT SENSOR with a more “ROBUST” resistor.

Both different sensors have the same part number but a different color *dot* on it.

All older sensors were destroyed & should not be in any inventory.

Part of the SUDS detection software is thru the HALL EFFECT SENSOR.

Most failed/failing HALL EFFECT SENSORS will trigger an “LE” error–but not always. On occasion–the motor will *growl* or exhibit a pronounced labored-effort sound.

Incorrect type and/or amount of detergent use—destroys the older HALL EFFECT SENSORS. Newer sensors are nearly immune to the higher electrical load placed upon it (suds drags/slows tub during high-speed spin).

Here’s the part link to the latest Hall Effect sensor used in LG washing machines, notice the red dot==> http://www.repairclinic.com/PartDetail/Motor-Sensor/1268238?modelNumber=WM2032HW

Samurai Appliance Repair Man
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Quick check for the diverter valve on a Fisher-Paykel GWL10 EcoDrive washer

A common-fail item in Fisher Paykel top loading washers is the diverter valve. This little doodad switches the water discharge flow from the pump to either recirculate in the tub or to drain out the drain hose. If you’re having problems either draining water or water coming into the tub and the draining right out, the first thing to check is the diverter valve.

Scholar of Advanced Appliantological Studies, DADoESTX, in the Samurai School of Appliantology, shares with us a quick and easy test of the diverter valve and control board:

If it’s recirculating properly for the Eco Active wash period, and continuing to recirculate during drain, then either the diverter is physically bad/jammed from switching position … or the controller board may be bad, sending power to the diverter continuously.

Fill the machine with water, then disconnect it from power for a while to insure the diverter is cooled and switched to drain mode (assuming it’s not jammed). Connect power and quickly set the machine to the final spin. If it drains without recirculating, the diverter is switching modes properly. Pause the cycle for a few minutes, restart the final spin again. If it recirculates, then the diverter has switched modes due to receiving power when it shouldn’t– bad control board.

Note also that the diverter can be activated/tested in Diagnostic Mode with the Delicate cycle button (same as Regular cycle button operates the pump). Delicate by itself only turns the diverter on or off (takes a couple mins for the wax motor to heat/cool and shift the valve). The pump must also be run to get either recirculation or draining.

IWL (Intuitive Eco) models, Fabric Care button runs the pump, Home buttons runs the diverter.

Samurai Appliance Repair Man
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Understanding Spin Sense in Older LG front load washers

On some older LG front loading washing machines, you’ll see a button called “Spin Sense.” The instructions on the panel say to press and hold for three seconds to activate. When you do, you’ll hear a chime but the machine seems to run the same way and you can’t even tell if the feature is working. Wassup w’dat “Spin Sense” bidness?

Sublime Master john63 from the Samurai School of Appliantology enlightens us with some background information on the Spin Sense™ technology:

SPIN SENSE is an older LG washer option.

Before the introduction of LGs “True Balance” technology (balance ring & inertia sensor)–the SPIN SENSE option was available.

For reasons that I’ve never been able to find—all LG washers were shipped from the factory with the SPIN SENSE option “disabled”.

To “enable” SPIN SENSE—Power on the washer. Select any cycle. Press the Start Button. Wait for the door to lock–single “click” sound. Press & hold a selector button (which indicates spin sense) for 3 to 6 seconds.

The SPIN SPEED indicator light will blink “on” & “off”. If the SPIN SPEED indicator does NOT blink at all—SPIN SENSE is not active (disabled).

Once SPIN SENSE has been enabled—it will remain so permanently (SPIN SPEED indicator light always blinks after door locks). To deactivate SPIN SENSE–simply repeat the procedure used to “enable” it. The SPIN SPEED indicator will stop “blinking”.

HOW DOES SPIN SENSE WORK?

The SPIN SENSE feature is primitive by today’s standards.

For the most part—SPIN SENSE does absolutely *nothing* unless a certain condition occurs—a violent imbalanced spin.

At which point the MAIN BOARD will slow down the spin speed by 50 RPM to reduce the severity of the imbalanced spin.

That’s all it does—nothing fancy.

Samurai Appliance Repair Man
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Frigidaire Affinity washer won’t start; E68 error code; replacing the water heating element

Example model number: ATF7000EG0

You may or may not see a fault code with this problem. Here’s an example of how this problem appeared to a Grasshopper in the Samurai School of Appliantology:

After shutting the door and pushing start on the washer you can hear the door locking mechanism engage and a quick check of the door shows that the door is indeed locked. Once the door locks the typical “hum” that is heard at the beginning of the cycle is heard and you can also hear what I assume is relays or a relay engaging but you never hear water flowing and within about 10-15 seconds the cycle stops and the door unlocks. No error codes are displayed.

In situations like this, it’s always a good idea to put the washer control console into service mode and see if there are any error codes that may be stored there. Here’s how:

READING ERROR CODES:

1. Wake the washer by pressing any button.
2. Wait 5 seconds.
3. Press and HOLD the Start/Pause and Cancel buttons simultaneously.

As long as the buttons are held, the failure code will appear in the display as an E followed by two numbers, a number and a letter or two letters. The control will beep and the Door Lock, Wash, Rinse, and Final Spin indicator lights will flash.

Quick Check

If there is no error displayed and the washer momentarily starts then turns back off:

1. Listen for a relay closure inside the motor control shortly after the Start/Pause key is pressed. If this happens, the motor control has power.

2. Check the 5 pin connector wiring between the console control and the motor control.

NOTE: During normal operation, the display may show:
“SAn” – deep clean (Sanitary Cycle)
“cd” – cool down (Sanitary cycle)
“do” or “dr” – door problem.
“Err” – an error has been detected.
“LOC” – control lock is activated.
“PAU” – cycle has been interrupted.

BTW, I’m getting all this good info from the tech sheet that comes supplied with every Frigidaire and Electrolux washing machine and is cleverly hidden inside the cabinet of the machine. Remove the toe panel to get to it. If someone “borrowed” yours and forgot to return it, you can borrow mine; just be sure to return it!

Some models of Affinity washers, such as ATF7000EG0, have a water heating element to boost water temperature. The element is mounted in the bottom of the outer tub. If there’s a problem with the water heating circuit, you’ll see an error code E68 in the display while in service mode. This means, “Current leakage to ground on heater or fuse opened.”

In reality, most the time you’ll see the heating element simply fail open as heating elements are prone to do. You can check continuity of the element from the back of the washer. Remove the back panel and look to the bottom of the tub, you’ll see the heating element terminals like ahso:

Frigidaire ATF7000EG0 Washer Heating Element
(click to enlarge)

You should read around 14 ohms on a good heating element. If the heating element is open or reads a very high resistance, then you need to replace it. Come git you one==> http://www.repairclinic.com/PartDetail/Heating-Element/1191170

Samurai Appliance Repair Man
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Kenmore Dryer 110.86863100 Schematic

Kenmore Dryer 110.86863100 Schematic

Kenmore Dryer 110.86863100 Schematic
(click to enlarge)

Samurai Appliance Repair Man
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Whirlpool Dryer LE5800XSN3 Schematic

Whirlpool Dryer LE5800XSN3 Schematic

Model number variations: LE5800XS

Whirlpool Dryer LE5800XSN3 Schematic
(click to enlarge)

Samurai Appliance Repair Man
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Frigidaire Air Conditioner FAZ12HS2A ENG. 13 Schematic

Frigidaire Air Conditioner FAZ12HS2A ENG. 13 Schematic

Frigidaire Air Conditioner FAZ12HS2A ENG. 13 Schematic
(click to enlarge)

Samurai Appliance Repair Man
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GE Washer WWA8800RBLWH Schematic

GE Washer WWA8800RBLWH Schematic

Model number variations: WWA8800RBL, WWA8800

GE Washer WWA8800RBLWH Schematic
(click to enlarge)

Samurai Appliance Repair Man
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