Category Archives: Repair Video

Dryer accumulates excessive lint and takes a long time to dry a load of clothes

Your Name: Doug

Type of Appliance: Dryer

Brand: Whirlpool

Model Number: ggw9200lw0

Your Precious Words:
I’ve had an issue a couple of different times with my Whirlpool Duet Dryer and it concerns me. Three different times, there has been enough lint accumulated in the lower compartment that it caught on fire. I’ve checked the exhaust vent and clean it regularly, same for the bottom compartment. Still, it seems like a considerable amount of lint makes it down to the bottom compartment. What happens then is that the lint catches fire and burns for a small time, melting the thermal fuse and shutting the gas valve down. My question is: Is this normal or am I missing a part (like a burner shield or something)? We clean the lint screen every load. One issue I suspect is that the felt seal on the front of the drum is failing (I can see it hanging out in a couple of places). Would that cause this problem? It also seems to take a considerable amount of time for our dryer to get our clothes dry (two-99 minute cycles per load usually does the trick).
What can I do???

Thank you!!!

What a timely question– I just wrote about this very scenario in the January issue of my award-winning newsletter, Appliantology: How to Use Your Dryer to Get Out of Your Mortgage.

That issue was such a home run with the jingle mail crowd that I did an encore presentation in the February issue: A Visual Guide to Dryer Vent Proctology.

BTW, if you’re not a subscriber to our free newsletter, Appliantology, you’re really missing out on Special Samurai Secrets™ like the ones mentioned above and much, much more! Subscribe to Appliantology today!

Okay, with that bit of shameless self-promotion out of the way, let’s move on to how we can fix your dryer problem. As explained in the two aforementioned Appliantology newsletter issues, the problem with your dryer is a bad vent. What makes a bad vent? Excessive back pressure. Also note that a vent can look good and still be bad or marginal. Watch this:

For the average homeowner, it probably makes more sense to buy and install a product like the LintAlert dryer vent monitor. It’s a lot less expensive that the tester I used in the video above and, once you install it, there’s no set up rigamarole to do– it just quietly monitors your dryer vent as you use it and lets you know if there’s a problem as it develops. It monitors the dryer vent system and displays a percentage of blockage. And LintAlert works with both gas and electric dryers, despite what you’ll read at the RepairClinic site where it says, “For gas dryers only.” This is not true. It works the same exact way on both gas and electric dryers. For electric dryers, you’ll need to plug the LintAlert device into a nearby 120vac outlet, the washer outlet will work just fine.

LintAlert

To learn more about your dryer, or to order parts, click here.

How to Fix a Frigidaire Front Load Washer that won’t Spin

Your Name: David

Type of Appliance: Washer

Brand: Fridaire

Model Number: ftfb4000gs0

Your Precious Words:
The motor will not do the final (fast) spin to get the majority of the water out. Although it does work in the agitation mode. I believe the error code is 43 ( control board)?

Error code 43 and no final spin both point to one and only one possibility: bad door lock assembly. Slam dunk. Buy it here with a one year return policy.

So David writes back:

Samurai,

Thanks for the quick reply

This may be a dumb question but how does the switch know what the motor speed is?

This reveals an complete misunderstanding of how these machines work and, I might add, a mistrust of my diagnosis. I’ve only seen this exact problem several hundred times and I keep three of these door lock assemblies on my service vehicle because I’m replacing them so often for this exact problem.

Nevertheless, because the Samurai is long-suffering and of great gootness, he shall reveal unto thee how it is that the door latch assembly is the root cause of this problem.

The door lock assembly is just a dumb switch– it has no idea about anything in the world except whether it’s open or closed. The control board, OTOH, is a smart sumbeech and is constantly going around the machine checking the motors and switches to see if things are where they’re supposed to be. One of the things it checks is the spin enable switch in the door latch assembly. If that switch is open, the control board will not allow the drum to go into spin mode. Without getting into a bunch of technical mumbo-jumbo, here’s a short cut method to check it:

But note as a point of comparison and contrast the situation where the drum NEVER moves– water comes in and pumps out but no tumble, no spin, no nuttin’. This is altogether a different problem from what we’ve discussed thus far– where the motor tumbles but won’t go into high speed spin.

In the case where the drum doesn’t move at all, ever, you need to break out your meter and the tech sheet from inside the washer and sing along with the Samurai in this video.

To learn more about your washing machine, or to order parts, click here.

Fixing a No-Cool Problem in a GE Side-by-Side Refrigerator

In this is exciting installment of Appliantology Live™, Samurai Appliance Repair Man goes undercover as The Appliance Guru and kicks some major appliance boot-ay on a GE refrigerator that’s lost its cool.

To learn more about your refrigerator, or to order parts, click here.

Troubleshooting A No-Drum Movement Problem In A Frigidaire Front-Load Washing Machine

In this thrilling excursion into Appliantological Excellence™, Samurai Appliance Repair Man takes you deep inside the belly of the beast to discover why the main motor on a Frigidaire front-load washer would not run in tumble or spin. The Samurai was running a service call as The Appliance Guru, his real-life appliance repair service bidness.

Here’s the motor control board I used to fix the problem: http://www.repairclinic.com/PartDetail/Motor-Control-Board/134149220/1206430

Comes with a one-year return policy, even after it’s been installed!

To learn more about your washing machine, or to order parts, click here.

Front Load Washer has a Loud Roaring Noise in Spin Cycle

Your Name: Joe

Type of Appliance: Washer

Brand: Whirlpool

Model Number: WTW6800WW1

Your Precious Words:
We have a loud roaring noise as the washer goes through the spin cycle.

Well, Joe, I gotta tell ya, pilgrim: you gots what we professional appliantologists call “bad drum bearings.” The roaring noise in spin is a definite clue. Here’s how to confirm:

Generally not worth repairing unless a) it’s under warranty or b) you’re gonna do all the work yourself (and maybe get the $500 part from Whirlpool for free– no guarantees on that!).

To learn more about your washing machine, or to order parts, click here.

Appliantology Newsletter: Special Weapons and Tactics in Appliance Repair


Appliantology Newsletter
Special Weapons and Tactics in Appliance Repair
October 19, 2012
Presents
Special Weapons and Tactics in Appliance Repair
All Master Appliantologists acquire advanced repair katas during their years of hand-to-machine combat with malfunctioning appliances. Examples of how some of these Special Weapons and Tactics are used in appliance repair include:

– diagnosing elusive or subtle problems

– gaining insight into the condition of a component and assessing its likelihood of future or imminent failure

– testing specialized components to see whether they’re good or bad

– facilitating or implementing a particular repair

In this special issue of Appliantology, I’ll reveal some of my personal, favorite SWATs that I use on some service calls which can also be useful for amateur appliantologists working on their own appliances.

The Hand-Held Steamer
Good for all kinds of household tasks such as cleaning and disinfecting, the mighty hand-held steamer is indispensable for some appliance repairs. For example, defrosting a frosted-up evaporator coil or clearing a clogged condensate drain in a refrigerator. In fact, since I’ve been using my steamer, I can’t imagine doing these types of repairs without it! It’s makes quick work of these messy jobs.

Take a look at the icy mess in the freezer in this video; this repair would have taken over two hours without a steamer but, with the steamer, I did this entire repair in less than an hour!

You can buy the very same steamer I used in the video at Amazon for $15 less than what I paid for it! http://amzn.to/OPggAo

Refrigerator Temperature Data Logger
Sometimes I run into situations where I need a way to log temperature data inside a refrigerator for at least 24 hours to get a clear picture of what’s going on inside that box. A couple of examples are:

1. Customer complains of warm temperatures in the beer compartment of her Maytag side-by-side refrigerator but says that the freezer compartment is fine (and we know how accurate customer temperature measurements are… NOT!). You arrive and measure the freezer temperature using your infrared temperature gun and get readings that vary from +5F to +12F. Marginal temperatures for a freezer but was that because it was just coming out of a defrost or off-cycle? Was the door recently opened just before you got there? You don’t know, and all you have is the one data point: the measurement you just made. Wouldn’t it help your diagnosis if you could put a data logger inside the freezer for a day or so and then look at a graph of the actual temperature measurements inside that freezer over time?

2. Customer complains that the freezer temperature in her GE built-in refrigerator fluctuates over time from 5F to 10F to 20F and then back to hard freeze. You maybe even verified this yourself (if you spent enough time there to do this). But how much time in a typical service call day do you have to babysit freezer temperatures? And you still wouldn’t be able to gather enough temperature-time data points to discern whether or not there’s a pattern to the fluctuations which could then be correlated to some other process in the refrigerator (defrost cycles, compressor cycles, etc.). Even seeing that there is no pattern, that the fluctuations are random, is also helpful because it could indicate something as simple as the door not being closed all the way (hinge adjustment issue?).

In cases like these, you just gotta be able to look at the temperature inside the compartment over an extended period of time. Enter the Supco LT2 LOGiT Dual Channel Temperature Data Logger. Here’s a video of me showing you how to set up and use the data logger:

Here’s the link where you can buy the Supco LT2 data logger at Amazon: http://amzn.to/WLMe2t

and you’ll need this software kit to get the data to your Windows PC, also available at Amazon: http://amzn.to/S3bmhb

Special Meter Technique for Testing a Microwave Oven High Voltage Rectifier
You probably know how to use a multimeter to make simple electrical measurements, like voltage and resistance. (If not, then see this page at my blog for a simple tutorial on using a multimeter: http://fixitnow.com/wp/2004/12/18/appliance-repair-revelation-making-basic-electrical-measurements/ ) But sometimes, you have to do a voltage test in an unusual way to check whether a component is good or bad. A common example of this is testing the high voltage rectifier (also called a diode) in a microwave oven. This is an inexpensive, common-fail part that will stop the microwave from heating if it breaks.

For most rectifiers, you test ’em by simply measuring the resistance and then switching the leads and checking it again– should read open (high resistance) in one direction and closed (low resistance) in the other. But microwave high voltage rectifiers are a special case because their internal resistance is so high that you’ll just read open in both directions and you can’t tell whether it’s good or bad that way. So, to test them, you have to actually do a voltage test using a 9 volt battery. This esoteric kata is fully revealed in this video:

The Mega-Ohm Meter (or “Megger”)
One of the common failures with a refrigerator compressor is that the varnish insulation on the motor windings starts to break down and then begins leaking current to ground. If the current leakage is large enough, you can deduce that this is happening by measuring compressor current draw– an abnormally high reading combined with the compressor running hotter than normal are sure signs that the insulation on the compressor motor windings is breaking down and the compressor is not long for this world.

Or you could directly test the compressor motor windings using an instrument called a mega-ohm meter, or “megger,” to directly test the integrity of the winding insulation. I use an inexpensive megger that cost less than $100 (back when I bought it a million years ago– it’s not much more than that now). This video shows using a megger to check the compressor motor:

You can buy the updated version of the Supco megger that I used in the video at Amazon: http://amzn.to/R8LDGd

The Clamp-On Amp Meter
Measuring current flow through a circuit or component is a powerful troubleshooting tool to have in your appliance repair SWAT bag.

For example, on a Bosch dishwasher that’s not heating, a quick current measurement a few minutes into the cycle will tell you whether or not current is flowing through the heater. If not, yet the control board is supplying 120 volts to the heater circuit, then you know the problem lies in the heating circuit itself because something in that circuit (heater, NTC, etc.) is open, stopping current flow.

Other times, the only way you can tell whether or not a part is bad is by measuring the current flow throughout that part. For example, the ignitor in a gas oven glows but the bake burner never fires up: is it a bad gas valve? Bad ignitor? Flip a coin and guess? No need to guess if you can make a simple current measurement. (Note that an ignitor can glow and still be bad– in fact, this is the most common case.) This video shows you how:

I prefer Fluke meters and I own two Fluke amp meters. Here’s the Amazon link to the one shown in the video, the Fluke T5, which is well under $100: http://amzn.to/Rd5pPh

And I also own the Fluke 322 which is a little more expensive (still under $100) but also more versatile: http://amzn.to/RIsQPf

And Hey!…
You can find whatever appliance part you need through the parts search box at Appliantology.org:

No harm in buying and trying with our 365-day, no-hassle return policy, even on electrical parts that were installed! And now shipping to Canada, too!

I frequently make videos when I’m on service calls and upload them to YouTube. Keep up with my latest uploads by subscribing to my YouTube channel: http://www.youtube.com/samurairepairman

Reading this online and want your own, personal copy of Appliantology delivered to your inbox in a discreet brown wrapper? Subscribe here: http://newsletter.appliantology.org/
Samurai Appliance Repair Man, www.Appliantology.org

Troubleshooting and Repairing a Front Loading Washing Machine that Overfills and Floods

Join Samurai Appliance Repair Man as he goes in batting cleanup behind a local parts changing monkey (PCM) who tried to fix a problem with a front loading washer that overfilled by blindly replacing parts, hoping to get lucky. Of course, he failed miserably but that didn’t stop him from charging the customer anyway. The customer called me out of frustration and desperation and, as usual, the Samurai delivers another appliance ass-whuppin’!

The other thing this video illustrates is the importance of understanding how the components inside an appliance are supposed to work together. How else can you troubleshoot? In this case, with the washer overfilling, starting troubleshooting at the water inlet valve is not a bad idea BUT what are you looking for? The PCM simply guessed and hoped to get lucky. But there’s no need to guess if you understand how the valve is supposed to work and can make a simple voltage measurement.

In this case, you would use your meter to see if the valve is still getting voltage when the drum was overfilling. If so, then the problem is NOT the valve, it lies in in the component that controls the valve. Here, the pressure switch controls the valve and this is the next thing the PCM replaced. But, again, there’s no need to guess because the switching function of the pressure switch can be tested using your ohm meter and gently blowing into the pressure tube to see if the pressure switch contacts change.

Actually, in the process of gaining access to the pressure tube to test the pressure switch, you would have discovered the chaffed pressure tube in the course of doing simple troubleshooting like a real technician and not just blindly thrashing about, throwing parts at the machine and ripping people off.

So, putting this all together, here’s a simple operational description of how these parts work together inside the washer:

As the water level in the drum rises, the pressure inside the pressure tube increases. This increased pressure is felt by the pressure switch which is calibrated to switch contacts at a specified pressure corresponding to a design fill level. The pressure switch, which was sending voltage to the water inlet valves during fill, then cuts voltage to the water inlet valves and the wash cycle begins.

Is that so hard to understand? How is it that someone who repairs appliances for a living does not understand this?

Here’s the new pressure tube I installed to fix this problem ==> http://www.repairclinic.com/PartDetail/Tube/WH41X10129/1168781

You can find whatever appliance part you need through the parts search box right here at Fixitnow.com. No harm in buying and trying with our 365-day, no-hassle return policy, even on electrical parts that were installed!

Subscribe to our FREE, award-winning newsletter, Appliantology: The Oracle of Appliance Enlightenment ==> http://newsletter.fixitnow.com and download your free report on appliance brand recommendations! Every issue is jam-packed with appliance repair tips and inside information direct from the Samurai’s fingertips to your engorged and tingling eyeballs.

The Appliance Guru provides prompt, convenient service in the following towns in New Hampshire: New London, Elkins, Wilmot, Springfield, Georges Mills, Sunapee, Mt. Sunapee, Newbury, Sutton, Bradford, Warner, Grantham, and the Eastman Community. Visit our website for more info and a discount coupon on your next service call: ==> http://applianceguru.com

Maytag Bravo / Whirlpool Cabrio / Kenmore Oasis washer leaks, puddle appears after use

In this excursion into appliance repair excellence, the Samurai shows you how to locate the source of a leak in a Maytag Bravo washing machine and how to fix it. In case you didn’t figure it out from the title of this post, the Maytag Bravo, Whirlpool Cabrio, and Kenmore Oasis washers are all the same machine, so this sublime repair kata applies to all three.

In these machines, the first thing to check for leaks is the pump. The other leak source is the tub seal. But leaking pumps are fairly common and also much easier to repair. Observe the technique of the Master:

Here’s the drain pump I used to fix this washer, in stock and ready to ship ==> http://www.repairclinic.com/PartDetail/Drain-Pump/W10217134/1472275?RCAID=24038

And this video has more detailed replacement procedures:

You can find whatever appliance part you need through the parts search box right here at Fixitnow.com. No harm in buying and trying with our 365-day, no-hassle return policy, even on electrical parts that were installed!

Subscribe to our FREE, award-winning newsletter, Appliantology: The Oracle of Appliance Enlightenment ==> http://newsletter.fixitnow.com and download your free report on appliance brand recommendations! Every issue is jam-packed with appliance repair tips and inside information direct from the Samurai’s fingertips to your engorged and tingling eyeballs.

The Appliance Guru provides prompt, convenient service in the following towns in New Hampshire: New London, Elkins, Wilmot, Springfield, Georges Mills, Sunapee, Mt. Sunapee, Newbury, Sutton, Bradford, Warner, Grantham, and the Eastman Community. Visit our website for more info and a discount coupon on your next service call: ==> http://applianceguru.com

Secret Samurai Trick for Correctly Diagnosing Refrigerator Compressor Start Problems

Sometimes, when you’re working on a compressor no-start problem, it’s a simple matter of replacing the compressor start relay. But is the bad relay the primary cause of the problem or a secondary effect from something else? Sometimes, it’s not obvious and it takes real Samurai Kidneys™ to discern what’s really going on. Watch and learn, Grasshoppah…

Here’s the relay and overload kit I used to fix the compressor ==> http://www.repairclinic.com/PartDetail/Relay-and-Overload-Kit/4387913/586521?RCAID=24038

And here’s the replacement condenser fan motor I installed ==> http://www.repairclinic.com/PartDetail/Condenser-Fan-Motor/833697/2790?RCAID=24038

One of the common failures with a compressor is that the varnish insulation on the motor windings starts to break down and current starts leaking to ground. If the current leakage is large enough, you can deduce that this is happening by measuring compressor current draw. Or you can directly check out the compressor motor windings using an instrument called a megger to directly test the integrity of the winding insulation. This video shows using a megger to check the compressor motor:

Here’s the updated Supco megger I use to check compressors ==> Supco M-500 Megohmmeter

You can find whatever appliance part you need through the parts search box right here at Fixitnow.com. No harm in buying and trying with our 365-day, no-hassle return policy, even on electrical parts that were installed!

Subscribe to our FREE, award-winning newsletter, Appliantology: The Oracle of Appliance Enlightenment ==> http://newsletter.fixitnow.com and download your free report on appliance brand recommendations! Every issue is jam-packed with appliance repair tips and inside information direct from the Samurai’s fingertips to your engorged and tingling eyeballs.

The Appliance Guru provides prompt, convenient service in the following towns in New Hampshire: New London, Elkins, Wilmot, Springfield, Georges Mills, Sunapee, Mt. Sunapee, Newbury, Sutton, Bradford, Warner, Grantham, and the Eastman Community. Visit our website for more info and a discount coupon on your next service call: ==> http://applianceguru.com

Ice Maker Repair Manual, troubleshooting aid

Your Name: Joe

Type of Appliance: Refrigerator

Brand: Sears – Kenmore

Model Number: 596.71813101

Your Precious Words:
Hi! Hope you can help me. My ice maker quit working. Do you have a repair manual with a full schematic which I could use to aid in trouble shooting?
If so, can I purchase one?

Thanks for any help and advice!

Joe

I can do waay better than a stinky ol’ manual– how’s about a Samurai Original™ how-to repair video?

And here’s my illuminating troubleshooting flowchart:

http://fixitnow.com/wp-content/uploads/2009/10/21562311-Troubleshooting-the-Whirlpool-Modular-Icemaker.pdf

More detailed info in this post ==> http://fixitnow.com/wp/2012/06/23/troubleshooting-a-no-ice-complaint-and-testing-replacing-a-whirlpool-modular-ice-maker/

BTW, I just covered this very topic in the last issue of our award-winning, internationally-acclaimed newsletter, Appliantology: The Oracle of Appliance Enlightenment. You should subscribe so you don’t miss out on future pearls of appliantological wisdom ==> http://newsletter.fixitnow.com and download your free report on appliance brand recommendations! Every issue is jam-packed with appliance repair tips and inside information direct from the Samurai’s fingertips to your engorged and tingling eyeballs.

You can find whatever appliance part you need through the parts search box at Fixitnow.com. No harm in buying and trying with our 365-day, no-hassle return policy, even on electrical parts that were installed!

The Appliance Guru provides prompt, convenient service in the following towns in New Hampshire: New London, Elkins, Wilmot, Springfield, Georges Mills, Sunapee, Mt. Sunapee, Newbury, Sutton, Bradford, Warner, Grantham, and the Eastman Community. Visit our website for more info and a discount coupon on your next service call ==> http://applianceguru.com

Samurai Appliance Repair Man

Troubleshooting a No-Ice Complaint and Testing-Replacing a Whirlpool Modular Ice Maker

The Whirlpool modular ice maker is the most commonly used ice maker in refrigerators today. You’ll even find these ice makers in non-Whirlpool refrigerators. If you’re a professional appliantologist, this is the ice maker you’ll most frequently encounter on service calls.


When you’re troubleshooting these ice makers for a no ice complaint, the first thing you need to know is the freezer temperature. There’s a thermostat built into the ice maker that will shut it off if the freezer temperature is above 17F. And unless you have a calibrated palm, you can’t tell the difference between 15F and 20F by feel so you have be able to get an accurate temperature shoot. I like using an infrared temperature gun; my personal favorite and the one I’ve used joyfully for years is the Raytek MT6 Non-contact MiniTemp Infrared Thermometer

Okay, if freezer temperature is good, then you focus on the Big Three Causes for No Ice in a Whirlpool Modular Ice Maker™:

– bad water inlet solenoid valve
– plugged ice maker fill tube
– bad ice maker control module

The easiest way to check all three at once is to run a manual harvest cycle on the ice maker. This video shows how to do that:

If the ice maker won’t start the harvest, it’s a dead ice maker or bad control module; doesn’t matter which, either way, just replace the whole ice maker. I used to mess around with replacing just the control module but for just a few bucks more, you can replace the entire ice maker and it’s a more reliable repair. Here’s the replacement ice maker kit I used to fix this problem ==> http://www.repairclinic.com/PartDetail/Ice-Maker-Assembly/4317943/1857

If the ice maker does the harvest but no water enters the mold at the end of the cycle, then either the fill tube is plugged or the water inlet valve is bad. This video shows how to test the water inlet valve:

This flowchart summarizes the troubleshooting algorithm for these modular ice maker units:

http://fixitnow.com/wp-content/uploads/2009/10/21562311-Troubleshooting-the-Whirlpool-Modular-Icemaker.pdf

You can buy the replacement water inlet valve for any brand or model of refrigerator here ==> http://www.repairclinic.com/Refrigerator-Valve-Float-Parts

You can find whatever appliance part you need through the parts search box at Fixitnow.com. No harm in buying and trying with our 365-day, no-hassle return policy, even on electrical parts that were installed!

The Appliance Guru provides prompt, convenient service in the following towns in New Hampshire: New London, Elkins, Wilmot, Springfield, Georges Mills, Sunapee, Mt. Sunapee, Newbury, Sutton, Bradford, Warner, Grantham, and the Eastman Community. Visit our website for more info and a discount coupon on your next service call ==> http://applianceguru.com

Subscribe to our FREE, award-winning newsletter, Appliantology: The Oracle of Appliance Enlightenment ==> http://newsletter.fixitnow.com and download your free report on appliance brand recommendations! Every issue is jam-packed with appliance repair tips and inside information direct from the Samurai’s fingertips to your engorged and tingling eyeballs.

Samurai Appliance Repair Man

Replacing an Electric Oven Bake Element with a Burnt Wire Connection

Replacing the bake or broil heating element in an electric oven is one of the easiest appliance repairs you’ll ever do… IF you unplug or kill power to range first. If you don’t kill power before you try to remove the element, you’ll turn a simple, plug n’ chug job that only requires a screwdriver into job that requires wire repair tools. That’s because you’re probably going to arc or burn one of the terminals attached to the heating element as shown in this video. Watch with amazed bewilderment as The Appliance Guru expertly replaces the burnt wire terminal and completes the job that the client started but couldn’t finish:

You can buy the replacement element for any brand or model of electric oven or range here with a 365-day return policy ==> http://www.repairclinic.com/Range-Stove-Oven-Heating-Element-Parts

And this video shows you the correct way to replace the element:

You can find whatever appliance part you need through the parts search box at Fixitnow.com. No harm in buying and trying with our 365-day, no-hassle return policy, even on electrical parts that were installed!

The Appliance Guru provides prompt, convenient service in the following towns in New Hampshire: New London, Elkins, Wilmot, Springfield, Georges Mills, Sunapee, Mt. Sunapee, Newbury, Sutton, Bradford, Warner, Grantham, and the Eastman Community. Visit our website for more info and a discount coupon on your next service call ==> http://applianceguru.com

Subscribe to our FREE, award-winning newsletter, Appliantology: The Oracle of Appliance Enlightenment ==> http://newsletter.fixitnow.com and download your free report on appliance brand recommendations! Every issue is jam-packed with appliance repair tips and inside information direct from the Samurai’s fingertips to your engorged and tingling eyeballs.

Samurai Appliance Repair Man

Fixing a Whirlpool Duet Sport Washer that Won’t Drain

This client called in with a complaint that his Whirlpool Duet Sport washer, WFW9150, was full of water and would not pump out. He was also getting the F9 E1 error code which corresponds to this problem. About 72.4% of problems are caused by something stuck in the pump, jamming the impeller. About 27.3% of these problems are caused a bad pump. The remaining 0.3% of these problems are caused by the pump not getting voltage which could be a bad wire connection or bad controller. Watch with befuddled amazement as The Appliance Guru expertly disassembles the pump, plucks out a broken piece of hair clip that was jamming the pump and restores this machine to its design function.

If the pump turns out to be bad in your washer, you can buy the replacement pump here with a 365-day return policy ==> http://www.repairclinic.com/PartDetail/Drain-Pump/W10130913/1373005

You can find whatever appliance part you need through the parts search box at Fixitnow.com. No harm in buying and trying with our 365-day, no-hassle return policy, even on electrical parts that were installed!

The Appliance Guru provides prompt, convenient service in the following towns in New Hampshire: New London, Elkins, Wilmot, Springfield, Georges Mills, Sunapee, Mt. Sunapee, Newbury, Sutton, Bradford, Warner, Grantham, and the Eastman Community. Visit our website for more info and a discount coupon on your next service call ==> http://applianceguru.com

Subscribe to our FREE, award-winning newsletter, Appliantology: The Oracle of Appliance Enlightenment ==> http://newsletter.fixitnow.com and download your free report on appliance brand recommendations! Every issue is jam-packed with appliance repair tips and inside information direct from the Samurai’s fingertips to your engorged and tingling eyeballs.

Samurai Appliance Repair Man

De-Mousifying the Control Panel in a Thermador PRSG364GD Range

This client called in with the complaint that the stove burners on her Thermador cooktop kept clicking after the burner was lit. Watch in horror and amazement as The Appliance Guru uncovers the gruesome cause for this problem. WARNING: This video contains scenes that some viewers may find disturbing. Viewer discretion advised.

You can find whatever appliance part you need through the parts search box at Fixitnow.com. No harm in buying and trying with our 365-day, no-hassle return policy, even on electrical parts that were installed!

The Appliance Guru provides prompt, convenient service in the following towns in New Hampshire: New London, Elkins, Wilmot, Springfield, Georges Mills, Sunapee, Mt. Sunapee, Newbury, Sutton, Bradford, Warner, Grantham, and the Eastman Community. Visit our website for more info and a discount coupon on your next service call ==> http://applianceguru.com

Subscribe to our FREE, award-winning newsletter, Appliantology: The Oracle of Appliance Enlightenment ==> http://newsletter.fixitnow.com and download your free report on appliance brand recommendations! Every issue is jam-packed with appliance repair tips and inside information direct from the Samurai’s fingertips to your engorged and tingling eyeballs.

Samurai Appliance Repair Man

Fixing a Frigidaire Front-Load Washer that Won’t Spin

This client contacted me at 9pm via email using the Service Call Request form at my service website, ApplianceGuru.com. I was there the next day to repair the no-spin problem with her washer. In this video, I explain a couple of short cut techniques for diagnosing a bad door latch assembly in this washer. I had a replacement door latch assembly on my service vehicle and got her fixed up in one trip. That’s SOP for The Appliance Guru!

Here’s the part link to the replacement door latch assembly, comes with a 365-day return policy ==> http://www.repairclinic.com/PartDetail/Door-Lock/131763202/1531974?RCAID=24038

You can find whatever appliance part you need through the parts search box at Fixitnow.com. No harm in buying and trying with our 365-day, no-hassle return policy, even on electrical parts that were installed!

The Appliance Guru provides prompt, convenient service in the following towns in New Hampshire: New London, Elkins, Wilmot, Springfield, Georges Mills, Sunapee, Mt. Sunapee, Newbury, Sutton, Bradford, Warner, Grantham, and the Eastman Community. Visit our website for more info and a discount coupon on your next service call ==> http://applianceguru.com

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Samurai Appliance Repair Man