Appliance Repair Revelation: Fisher & Paykel DD602 Dishdrawer: F1 code

by Samurai Appliance Repair Man on October 25, 2004

in Dishwasher Repair

appliance tip of the day archiveI had the opportunity to work on a Fisher & Paykel DD602 dishdrawer a couple days ago. By the way, I’m a big fan of Fisher & Paykel equipment–if you ever have the opportunity to work on one, you’ll see why. The engineering is elegant in its simplicity. Well-engineered equipment is actually much easier to work on because they’ve designed serviceability into the product.

Anyway, the problem with this particular dishdrawer was that the top drawer (with an 11 minute wash) was giving an F1 error code after the initial rinse, about five minutes into the cycle. The F1 code indicates an overfill condition. One of the most common causes for an overfill fault is that the dishwasher cannot pump out the dirty water due to a plugged drain hose.

So, I put the dishdrawer into diagnostic mode and tested the fill and pumpout functions–everything was peachy. I ran the top drawer in a normal wash cycle and, sho ’nuff, the drawer faulted out on F1 after the first rinse. Well, Houston, we had a problem and it was time for the Samurai to break open a can of whup-ass on this dishdrawer. First thing I did was pull the front panel off the drawer, like ahso:

Fisher Paykel DD602 dishdrawer with the front panel removed

Fisher Paykel DD602 dishdrawer with the front panel removed.

With that front panel off, I pulled the wire harness connectors off the main control board (lower right-hand side) to inspect for gookus. None found–my quest continued.

The next step to remove the botton drawer from the unit so I could inspect the flood switch. In order to do this, I had to remove the wire harness cover on the underside of the drawer. This is what the underside of the dishdrawer looks like with the botton cover panel removed:

Fisher Paykel DD602 dishdrawer - looking at the underside of one of the drawers with the wire cover plate removed
Fisher Paykel DD602 dishdrawer, looking at the underside of one of the drawers with the wire cover plate removed.

With the bottom cover off, I could unclip the wire harness, fill hose, and drain hose. Then I unclipped the linkage at the back of the drawer and lifted the drawer off the slider arms. All this to expose the flood switch, shown on the left-hand side of the bottom panel in the picture below:.

Fisher Paykel DD602 dishdrawer with the lower drawer removed
Fisher Paykel DD602 dishdrawer with the lower drawer removed. The flood switch in mounted on the base, left hand side.

After noting the positions of the wires on the flood switch and removing them, I unclipped the switch housing from the base panel. The switch housing contains one switch for each drawer. The switches are wired normally closed (NC) and each switch has three spade connections, so it’s important to note where the wires went. With the switch housing out, I could ohm out both switches and both checked good. I inspected the contacts and noticed that one of them was oxidized, evidenced by discoloration.

I had a flash-back to my Navy days and heard Petty Officer (AT1) Crowe’s voice in my head, “Here, take this ruby red eraser and clean off them contacts. That’ll restore the current flow for that circuit. Good to go, Sailor.” You gotta understand, Petty Officer Crowe was my technical guru in the Navy; he taught me many of the practical and theoretical troubleshooting skills that I still use today.

So I cleaned the contacts as instructed by Petty Officer Crowe’s mental image in my brain and reassembled the dishdrawer. I ran the top drawer and…no F1 error code! I ran it several more times just to be sure.

Good to go, Sailor.

grasshoppers sitting with the master to eat their pressed rats and warthogs on dishes cleaned in their newly-repaired Fisher and Paykey dishdrawer.