Speed Queen Dryer Blew Thermal Fuse and Now Thermostat

by Samurai Appliance Repair Man on November 26, 2005

in Dryer Repair

Manas wrote:

About 6 months ago I replaced the thermal fuse on my Speed queen Dryer. It seemed to fix the ‘no heat’ problem (the vent is clean). Recently, I have lost heat again, appears the the thermostat (p.# 62641) is bust (no continuity). This manifested by the heating taking longer and longer, to now being totally cold. Oh wise one, what does this trend indicate?

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Whenever a thermal fuse blows, I always check the vent. What am I checking for, just the presence of lint? Nay, nay, intrepid grasshopper, there is much more to good dryer venting than merely the absence of the flammable mixture of human skin, mites, and clothing fibers, a.k.a. dryer lint. How much more? Read and learn.

Best maintenance practices also dictate that whenever either the thermal fuse or the thermostat are found to be bad, that both parts are replaced at the same time to avoid exactly the situation you’re now in.


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{ 2 comments… read them below or add one }

evanky April 8, 2006 at 11:49 am

I’ve got a Speed Queen aem497w and the dryer stopped heating. It would spin but no heat. I took it apart thinking that the thermal fuse would be blown but it looks alright (has continuity.) The obvious problem is that the wire that goes between the high limit thermostat and the heating element was fried in half near the connector to the heating element. The heating element still has continuity but I don’t have an ohmeter to check what the resistance actually is… Same deal with the high limit thermostat.

what allowed that much juice to get through?

the vent had a kink in it but at this point what can i do?

Samurai Appliance Repair Man April 8, 2006 at 3:40 pm

“Juice” is something you drink; when used with reference to electricity it is both nebulous and ignorant. Don’t do it again.

The burnt connection you found became that way because of a loose connection– loose connection == high resistance == excessive heat generation. Repair that connection using all fresh, new wire and you’ll be good to go.

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