Kenmore Dryer Won’t Work

by USMC5952 on November 5, 2005

in Dryer Repair

Grasshopper writes:

I have a kenmore electric dryer. When I turned it on, it wouldn’t tumble. I checked the door switch and others all good. The thermal fuse had blown. Once replaced I tried it again and it still didn’t work. The unit was getting power. During the timed dry cycle it would count down; however, any other cycle didn’t count down. Obviously the timer is running fine. I tried it again and this time the unit attempted to move; however, immediately started to smoke. I unplugged the unit and looked for burnt wires. I pulled the contacts appart and cleaned them (some were burnt – they aren’t anymore). I checked the thermal fuse and other thermostats, all are still good. The door switch burnt out this time. I replaced it and and checked the unit again. Once again, it attempted to work; however, it smoked and burnt again. This is where I am. A dryer unplugged from the wall with a bad door switch in need of repair. I believe I have a short somewhere (which surprises me) because I haven’t changed anything that would cause this problem unless I put the wires on the cycle selector wrong (I drew them out before removing). Does anyone have a wiring diagram, repair manual, or suggestions where to look?


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{ 1 comment… read it below or add one }

Samurai Appliance Repair Man November 6, 2005 at 3:13 am

You’re going to need to get the wiring diagram (usually located in the control console) and troubleshoot the circuitry. There’s no silver bullet on this one and it’s gonna take real kidneys to find the problem on this beast. Could be a patch of wire insulation got rubbed off has created an intermittent short; maybe a control, switch or motor was miswired during one of your previous repair efforts; maybe the motor has developed a short to ground. These are just a few of the possibilities. Use your multi-meter to nail down the problem. And be sure to observe Samurai’s Ichiban Law of Appliance Repair.

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