Replacing the Transmission in a GE Top-Loading Washing Machine

by Samurai Appliance Repair Man on November 26, 2007

in Washer Repair

This how-to applies to the cheap, GE top-loading washers, like the one you bought at Home Depot, with model numbers like WPSR3100WOWW. Some of the busted-transmission symptoms on this washer include:

- Loud roar like a jet engine during spin;
- Won’t agitate (Note 1: you already checked the belt and it’s OK; Note 2: a stripped out agimutator drive bell will also cause this problem, but this will be obvious when you remove the agimutator);
- Puddle of viscous red/brown oil underneath the washer.

If your washer has any of the above, then your washer’s transmission may be FUBAR. You need to either replace the transmission in this machine or buy a new washer. BTW, now is a good time to think about buying a new washer.

“*Gasp!* But, Samurai, how could you, the Fermented Grand Master of Appliantology and All Things Appliantological, even think about buying a new machine instead of doing the repair?”

Ahh, well said, my young grasshoppah; I couldn’t have asked a better question myself. According to Proto Grand Master Musashi, in the true strategy of Fixite Do, you learn to perceive that which you cannot understand or comprehend. In the words of Master Musashi, “By knowing things that exist, you can know that which does not exist.” Accordingly, I perceive that the money you now have in your bank account will no longer exist after you waste your time and cash fixing this pig.

OK, let’s light this candle.

- Basic disassembly help here.

- Parts you’ll need:

Now, I turn you over to my brother in The Craft and recent Appliantology 3000® microchip implantee, Jedi Appliance Guy.

The Jedi has created a very detailed step-by-step photo album on Flickr showing him executing this repair with his legendary finesse (including some patented Jedi-exclusive techniques). And many of the photos are annotated with pearls of enlightenment. So, to get the best overview of the Hell you’re in for should you decide to take on this repair– due to a dietary deficiency of Vitamin C, or something– start with this first photo in the set and then click through each one. That way, you can read the helpful notes and comments.

And may the pot-bellied, bald-headed Buddha grin down on yo’ ace.


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